antennas

WHAT IS AN ANECHOIC CHAMBER AND WHY IS IT USED?

WHAT IS AN ANECHOIC CHAMBER AND WHY IS IT USED?

I’ve spent a large amount of time working in anechoic chambers, and possibly even longer analysing the data I’ve collected in them.  There is something very peaceful about working in a nice quite air-conditioned room with just the background hum of some radio frequency equipment.  It almost offsets the problem of the grey colour your hands turn from the carbon in the radar absorbing material.  Over the years I was often asked what the anechoic chamber was and why it was used, so here is a quick introduction to all things anechoic chamber.

CHOOSE YOUR RADOME WISELY

The word radome is a portmanteau of the words radar and domes, they are designed to cover an antenna and protect it from the elements.  Growing up near the golf balls in the North York Moors I have known about radomes for a long time, and always found them fascinating.  I was really happy that one of the first jobs I had when I started in engineering was to ‘just look after’ the design and manufacture of a new radome.  It was supposed to be just a part time occupation for a few weeks.  However, it turned into a full-time job of several years to get a good radome design that could be repeatably manufactured and worked well with my antenna.  In this blog I am going to look at different types of radome shape, material and thickness.